CoolZone™ Hot Tub Cooling Systems: Are They Worth It?

Jennifer Rhodes

By Jennifer Rhodes · Updated

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Are you looking to enjoy a refreshingly cool spa experience this summer? CoolZone™ hot tub cooling systems may be worth considering.

These are external systems that can be added to certain spas. They offer precise temperature control that can range from 60 to 104 degrees Fahrenheit, so you can enjoy a colder soak than most other hot tubs offer.

Read on to find out more about CoolZone™ hot tub cooling systems—and how to decide if they are worth it for your personal spa.

How much does a CoolZone system cost?

The cost of a CoolZone system depends on the specific dealer and the area where you live. Dealers can set their own pricing, but quotes for the CoolZone system are typically in the $2,000-$4,000 range.

The price includes the unit itself plus professional installation.

Which spas are compatible with CoolZone?

CoolZone hot tub cooling systems are currently only compatible with Caldera and HotSpring spas.

So if you're particularly interested in being able to run your spa cold, know that you will be restricted to one of these brands if you are set on CoolZone.

Can you add a CoolZone system later?

Yes, it is possible to add a CoolZone hot tub cooling system later. CoolZone systems can be retrofit to most existing Caldera or HotSpring hot tubs, allowing for a flexible way to add cooling to your spa if you're still undecided at the time of purchase.

Is CoolZone worth it?

CoolZone hot tub cooling systems are an innovative and effective way to enjoy a comfortable hot tub experience, even in hot weather. Not only are these systems designed for high efficiency and performance, but the wide temperature range means you could also get more use out of your hot tub.

That said, the reality is that most people won't actually want to run a hot tub at 60 degrees. That's cold even for hot summer days! Most regular hot tubs can run at 80 degrees, which feels plenty cool enough once you're in the water.

If you live in a very hot, desert climate (think Vegas or Arizona), a CoolZone system could be worth it for you. But otherwise, you can probably get away with just running your spa at its coolest temperature and using other cooling methods.

How to cool a hot tub without CoolZone

Cooling a hot tub can be done with a variety of other techniques if you are willing to apply a little creativity:

  • Adjust the temperature: It sounds simple, but your hot tub is designed to regulate the water temperature, so adjusting the thermostat down can help to cool the water—or at least stop it from heating. Obviously this will have limited use if the ambient temperature is higher than the lowest setting on your spa, but it's a good place to start.
  • Add ice to the water: If your fridge has an ice maker, you can add ice to the water to help cool it down. This is a quick and easy way to lower the temperature of the water, but keep in mind that the ice will melt and could dilute the chemicals in your hot tub, so you may need to adjust the chemical levels afterwards.
  • Add some cold water: Another option is to use a hose or bucket of cold water to help cool down the hot tub. This will lower the overall temperature of the water, but again, it could dilute the chemicals in your hot tub, so be sure to check the levels once you're done.
  • Use shade to your advantage: If your spa is out in the open, the sun on a hot day will keep warming it up. Adding a cantilever umbrella or other source of shade is a good way to keep it out of the sun—as well as providing you with sun protection while you use the spa.

Closing thoughts

In conclusion, CoolZone hot tub cooling systems can be a great way to keep your hot tub water cool and comfortable all summer long. They are energy efficient, relatively simple to install, and usually require little maintenance.

However, there are currently only two brands of spa that are compatible with CoolZone. What's more, you'll only really get the full benefit from it if you live in a very hot climate—or if you like to dip in very cold water.

If this doesn't apply to you, you're probably better off cooling your spa with other methods.

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